The core of my research program is focused on quantifying bedform kinematics in modern and ancient environments, studied primarily through analogue experimentation and field observations. Rivers are the primary sculptors of Earth's unglaciated landscapes despite widespread morphological variability in different geologic settings, climatic zones, and geographic locations. Worldwide, rivers and streams act as dense, interconnected conveyor belts that transport sediment from its weathering source to depositional archive in the sedimentary record. Fluvial material makes up large proportions of the rock record, and is one of the principal records from which terrestrial paleoclimate and paleotectonic records are constructed. Better understanding of sediment transport mechanics enables a more sophisticated understanding of past and present river dynamics, landscape evolution, riparian management, and fluvial engineering. I plan to continue developing a grain- to reach-scale approach to quantitatively assess bedform kinematics and their relationship to fluvial hydraulics in modern and ancient systems.

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